Veteran Trauma Support Network

THE BIGGEST THREAT
TO OUR U.S. VETERANS IS 
NO LONGER BULLETS… IT’S THEIR BRAINS.

THE BIGGEST THREAT
TO OUR U.S. VETERANS IS 
NO LONGER BULLETS… IT’S THEIR BRAINS.

WHO WE ARE

The Veterans Trauma Support Network was founded to provide assistance in the form of therapy and counseling services to the brave men and women who serve and protect our great nation. From soldiers who served in previous wars to service men and women currently protecting our country and suffering the affects of battle.

DID YOU KNOW THESE FACTS ABOUT OUR VETERANS?

Disabled Veterans

Did You Know?

2,354,700 out of 8,958,400 non-institutionalized civilian veterans aged 21 to 64 years reported having a VA service-connected disability in the United States in 2017.

Millions of Veterans are facing disabilities and the government is letting these Veterans down. Help us fight for our Veteran heroes!

Veteran Suicide

Did You Know?

There are between 16-20 veterans that take their own lives every single day in our country.

Veteran suicide rates increased by 26% since 2005.

VA: Suicide rate for younger veterans increased by more than 10 percent

Please Support Our Veterans!

NEWS & EVENTS

Stay up to date with VTSN and what we are doing in the community! Veterans are the lifeblood that has kept our country safe. Our Veterans deserve it the most, but unfortunately many times have it the least. We can change that through therapy programs and much more.

  • How do we help?
  • Letters to Vets
  • Volunteer spotlight

Our Therapies

We use HBOT as a procedure to increase oxygen in the body, under pressure, to encourage improvement for conditions such as PTSD or Depression in our Veterans.

Group Therapy

It's hard to leave everything you see in war overseas. Many times these feelings come back with you. Group therapy provides an escape to suffering veterans to begin healing from conditions such as PTSD, Anxiety and Severe Depression

Inspired Performance Institute

VTSN gets assistance from this amazing organization. Since 2015, the Inspired Performance Institute has worked to create innovative strategies to help people heal from the limiting effects of trauma, so they can feel and perform at their best.

Messages

Veronica

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John Lennon

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Mike Smith

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Volunteer Spotlight

Say Hello to Alice

“A few years ago, I started looking for worthwhile volunteer opportunities. VTSN became my main outlet for what I believe to be a worthwhile positive change our Veterans and this world truly needs. Most people forget that Veterans don’t always have the loudest voice and that someone needs to stand up for them. Healing through therapy and advocating for our heroes is what VTSN stands for. I would urge you to stand with them. Thank you to the entire VTSN team for everything you do! I highly encourage all you viewers to donate to support our Veterans!”

MAKE AN IMPACT

Donate your time, talent or treasure.

Make a Financial Donation

Donate today to help fight for our Veteran Heroes. They deserve it the most, yet in many cases have it the least.

Become an Ambassador

Share our cause with your world by sharing on your social media, emailing your friends, or even starting a fundraiser for our Vets.

Sign Our
Petition

Sign petitions that will call congress to action. These petitions help ensure our Vets are getting the support they deserve.

Write a Thank You Letter

Write a thank you letter to our Veterans to give them words of encouragement.

Did You Know?

There were around 20.4 million U.S. veterans in 2016, according to data from the Department of Veterans Affairs, representing less than 10% of the total U.S. adult population.

The share of the U.S. population with military experience is declining. In 2016, 7% of U.S. adults were veterans, down from 18% in 1980, according to the Census Bureau. This drop coincides with decreases in active duty personnel.

The VA’s projections suggest that the number of Vets will continue to decline in the coming decades. By 2045, the department estimates there will be around 12 million veterans, a roughly 40% decrease from current numbers.

Did You Know?

The Department of Veterans Affairs receives a low favorability rating. While the general public expresses favorable views of many federal agencies, the VA on the other hand received the lowest rating over 10 agencies and departments in a Pew Research Center survey. Only 49% of U.S. adults had a favorable view of the VA and 34% expressed an unfavorable view. As with all the agencies and departments in the survey, there were partisan differences.

Our Veterans are not getting they were promised and definitely not the care they deserve!

Get help filing your claim or appeal

If you need help filing a claim or appeal, you may want to work with an accredited attorney, a claims agent, or a Veterans Service Officer (VSO). We trust these professionals because they’re trained and certified in the VA claims and appeals processes and can help you with VA-related needs.

VSOs work on behalf of Veterans and service members—as well as their dependents and survivors. Find out more about accredited representatives and how they can help you.

What does it take to be an accredited representative or a VSO?

Accredited representatives and VSOs need to:

  • Pass an exam
  • Pass a background check
  • Take continuing-education courses to make sure they’re providing the most up-to-date information

Recognized organizations and individuals can legally represent a Veteran, service member, dependent, or survivor before VA. Non-recognized organizations and individuals can provide information, but can’t be representatives.

What does an accredited representative or a VSO do?

Accredited representatives and VSOs can help you understand and apply for VA benefits, like:

  • Financial support (monthly payments)
  • Education
  • Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR&E)
  • Home loans
  • Life insurance
  • Pension
  • Health care
  • Burial benefits

These trained professionals can also:

  • Help you gather supporting documents (like a doctor’s report or medical test results)
  • File a claim or appeal on your behalf
  • Provide added support, like helping with transportation to medical appointments or emergency funds

Note: Veterans Service Officers work for Veterans Service Organizations (both are called VSOs), as well as for local government offices.

What does it cost to use an accredited representative or a VSO?

In general, no individual or organization may charge you a fee to help you file your initial application for benefits. But they may charge you for unusual expenses. It’s only after we’ve made a decision about your original claim that VA-accredited claims agents and attorneys may charge for their services. Make sure you ask up front what, if any, fees you’ll be charged. If you believe a claims agent or attorney charged a fee that’s too high, you can challenge it.
Find out more in the “How to Challenge a Fee” guide

How do I find an accredited representative or a VSO?

You can find an accredited representative or a VSO in 1 of 2 ways:

  • Go to eBenefits to find a local representative (including a recognized VSO, an attorney, or a claims agent) by state/territory, zip code, or the organization’s name.
    Go to eBenefits
  • Or search the VA Office of the General Counsel’s list to find VA-recognized organizations and VA-accredited individuals by name, city, state, or zip code.
    Search the VA Office of the General Counsel’s list

How do I set up an accredited representative or a VSO to work on my behalf?

You’ll need to either use eBenefits or fill out a form and mail it in.

Choose one of these ways to get set up:

  • Use eBenefits to let us know you’ll be working with a representative or to change your current representation.
    Go to eBenefits
  • To have a VSO help you, fill out an Appointment of Veterans Service Organization as Claimant’s Representative (VA Form 21-22).
    Download VA Form 21-22 (PDF)
  • To have a claims agent or attorney help you, fill out an Appointment of Individual as Claimant’s Representative (VA Form 21-22a).
    Download VA Form 21-22a (PDF)

If you’re filling out one of the forms, you’ll need to mail it to your nearest VA regional office. Please speak to the service organization or representative before you send your request.
Find a VA regional office near you

More information about filing disability claims

  • Fully developed disability claims

Find out how to use the Fully Developed Claims program to get a faster decision on your claim by sending in all the evidence you have—or can easily get—when you file your claim.

  • Pre-discharge claim

If you have 90 to 180 days left on active duty, find out how to file a disability claim through the Benefits Delivery at Discharge (BDD) program to get your benefits sooner.

  •  How VA assigns disability ratings

Find out how we assign ratings for service-connected disabilities.

  • Disabilities that appear within 1 year after discharge

Find out if you’re eligible for disability compensation for a disability that appeared within a year after you were discharged from service.

 

*Source:  https://www.va.gov/disability/get-help-filing-claim/

Benefit Rates

Access Current Rates

Learn More about VA Compensation Rates

How VA Calculates Compensation Rates

The amount of basic benefit paid ranges, depending on how disabled you are. VA makes a determination about the severity of your disability based on the evidence you submit as part of your claim, or that VA obtains from your military records. VA rates disability from 0% to 100% in 10% increments (e.g. 10%, 20%, 30% etc.). See the Combined Ratings section below for information about how VA calculates disability percentage for multiple disabilities.

You may be paid additional amounts, in certain instances, if:

  • You have very severe disabilities or loss of limb(s)
  • you have a spouse, child(ren), or dependent parent(s)
  • you have a seriously disabled spouse

Cost-of-Living Adjustments (COLA)

Periodically, VA makes cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) to VA compensation and pension benefits to ensure that the purchasing power of VA benefits is not eroded by inflation. Under federal law, the cost-of-living adjustments to VA’s compensation and pension rates are the same percentage as for Social Security benefits. You can learn more about COLA’s on the Social Security Administration’s COLA webpage.

Combined Ratings

If VA finds that a Veteran has multiple disabilities, VA uses the Combined Ratings Table below to calculate a combined disability rating. Disability ratings are not additive, meaning that if a Veteran has one disability rated 60% and a second disability 20%, the combined rating is not 80%. This is because subsequent disability ratings are applied to an already disabled Veteran, so the 20% disability is applied to a Veteran who is already 60% disabled. Below you will find the steps VA takes to combine ratings for more than one disability and examples using the Combined Ratings Table to illustrate how combined ratings are calculated.

  1. The disabilities are first arranged in the exact order of their severity, beginning with the greatest disability and then combined with use of Combined Ratings Table below
  2. The degree of one disability will be read in the left column and the degree of the other in the top row, whichever is appropriate
  3. The figures appearing in the space where the column and row intersect will represent the combined value of the two
  4. This combined value is rounded to the nearest 10%
  5. If there are more than two disabilities, the combined value for the first two will be found as previously described for two disabilities
  6. The exact combined value (without rounding yet), is combined with the degree of the third disability
  7. This process continues for subsequent disabilities and the final number is rounded to the nearest 10%

Examples of Combining Two Disabilities

If a Veteran has a 50 percent disability and a 30 percent disability, the combined value will be found to be 65 percent, but the 65 percent must be converted to 70 percent to represent the final degree of disability.

Similarly, with a disability of 40 percent, and another disability of 20 percent, the combined value is found to be 52 percent, but the 52 percent must be converted to the nearest degree divisible by 10, which is 50 percent.

Example of Combining Three Disabilities

If there are three disabilities ratable at 60 percent, 40 percent, and 20 percent, respectively, the combined value for the first two will be found opposite 60 and under 40 and is 76 percent. This 76 will be found in the left column, then the 20 rating in the top row. The intersection of these two ratings is 81. Thus, the final rating will be rounded to 80%.

Table I-Combined Ratings Table
[10 combined with 10 is 19]
 102030405060708090
19273543516068768492
20283644526068768492
21293745536168768492
22303845536169778492
23313846546269778592
24323947546270778592
25334048556370788593
26334148566370788593
27344249566471788593
28354250576471788693
29364350576572798693
30374451586572798693
31384552596672798693
32394652596673808693
33404653606773808793
34414754606774808793
35424855616874818794
36424955626874818794
37435056626975818794
38445057636975818894
39455157637076828894
40465258647076828894
41475359657176828894
42485459657177838894
43495460667277838994
44505561667278838994
45515662677378848995
46515762687378848995
47525863687479848995
48535864697479849095
49545964697580859095
50556065707580859095
51566166717680859095
52576266717681869095
53586267727781869195
54596368727782869195
55606469737882879196
56606569747882879196
57616670747983879196
58626671757983879296
59636771758084889296
60646872768084889296
61656973778184889296
62667073778185899296
63677074788285899396
64687175788286899396
65697276798386909397
66697376808386909397
67707477808487909397
68717478818487909497
69727578818588919497
70737679828588919497
71747780838688919497
72757880838689929497
73767881848789929597
74777982848790929597
75788083858890939598
76788183868890939598
77798284868991939598
78808285878991939698
79818385879092949698
80828486889092949698
81838587899192949698
82848687899193959698
83858688909293959798
84868789909294959798
85878890919394969799
86878990929394969799
87889091929495969799
88899092939495969899
89909192939596979899
90919293949596979899
91929394959696979899
92939494959697989899
93949495969797989999
94959596969798989999

*Source: https://www.benefits.va.gov/compensation/rates-index.asp

Did You Know?

Veteran Homelessness is a serious issue in our country. There is an estimated 630,000 homeless individuals on the streets any given night in the United States and 1 out of every 10 is a Veteran! Our country tries to protect our Veterans, but they are slipping through the cracks.

Here are some Stats:

  • Over 968,000 veterans lived in poverty in the last year.
  • 20,000 veterans with government sponsored mortgages lost their homes in 2010.
  • 76% of homeless veterans experience alcohol, drug, or mental health issues.
  • 30.2% of veterans ages 18-24 are unemployed.

There are a variety of reasons why these veterans are believed to be homeless and contrary to popular belief it appears these are the veterans with above average track records. It is easy to jump to conclusions so here is the data behind Veteran Homelessness.

  • 89% received an honorable discharge.
  • 67% served 3 years or more.
  • 47% are Vietnam veterans
  • 15% served before Vietnam
  • 5.5% are Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.

These stats alone should be enough to show that these veterans served their country well and did they job to protect the freedoms Americans enjoy today.